Pregnancy

Having sex while pregnant

Happy young husband kissing his smiling pregnant wife

This article may help answer:

Can I have sex while I’m pregnant?

Does sex while pregnant hurt the baby?

Should I use contraception while pregnant?

Pregnancy is different for every woman. While some feel at their sexiest with a growing bump, others might not feel so comfortable. The thing to know is that pregnancy should not stand in the way of a healthy sex life and if you want to have sex, then you should, unless you have any medical concerns.

Find out more:

    Thanks to the hormones – yes, them again! – some women will not feel like having sex at all during pregnancy. A combination of morning sickness, fatigue and general discomfort as your bump grows, can lead to a feeling that sex just isn’t a good idea.

    Talk to your partner about how you’re feeling and if you really don’t want to have sex, try other ways to stay close. Having a cuddle, holding hands while on a walk, or just talking about how you feel can help retain intimacy.

    On the other hand, some women find pregnancy their sexiest time and their libido can skyrocket. Again, it’s those pesky hormones at work, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Just make sure to stay in a position that feels safe and comfortable.

    In a word, no. Your baby is protected by the amniotic sac. But be sensible. Your body shape, size and weight is changing. So any Cirque du Soleil-style moves might be best put on the back burner.

    A good rule of thumb is, if it hurts, don’t do it. And if you have any real concerns, talk to your doctor.

    It is safe to have sex gently in any position during the first trimester. However, from week 20 pregnant women should avoid laying on their back for prolonged periods as it can interrupt blood flow to you and your baby.

    For more information on staying safe while having sex during pregnancy click here

    It may be best to check in with your doctor if you had a premature labour in a previous pregnancy, if you experience spotting or bleeding, if you are having twins, if you have placenta praevia or any cervical concerns.

    While not medically impossible – some mammals can experience a second conception shortly after the first, known as superfetation – it’s is EXTREMELY unlikely in humans. So, there is no need to use contraception during your pregnancy.

    You’ve read advice on:

    How to keep sex safe during pregnancy

    How to talk to your partner about having sex while pregnant

    The need for contraception during pregnancy

    See the pregnancy checklist